Es para poder identificarte cuando participes del Concursoy para que puedas acceder a la lectura Interactiva de Bridge en español y portugués
Vea los Rankings de cada Categoría: Libres, Damas, Juveniles y Senior conozca los nombres de los jugadores mejor rankeados de la Zona III Resultados de los Torneos Sudamericanos desde el año 2005, años pares y Transnacional años impares. Categoría Libre, Damas, Juveniles y Senior Concurso de Remate On-Line Semanal Comentarios de Maestros Sudamericanos ya participan mas de 500 personas no te lo pierdas Paneles de expertos de Brasil y USA compita contra los mejores jugadores del mundo Articulos, Tests, Ejercicios On Line, Reportajes,  bridge en español y portugués, Manos, Remates, Carteos Circuito de Torneos Internacionales de Bridge en Sudamrica dirigidos por el Director Gustavo Chediak Circuito de Torneos
VOLVER AL INICIO - AGREGAR A FAVORITOS

                                                         

 

  Nov. 07/99

 

JUST BRIDGE...

 

SOMETIMES ON SUNDAY
TEST YOUR OPENING LEAD JUDGMENT

 

by Beverly Kraft -Eric Kokish

 

 There are seldom any guarantees when choosing an opening lead, but there are some general principles that will help you reach a sensible conclusion most of the time. Test yourself in the following scenario.

East deals Both vulnerable

West North East South
    1 Pass
2 Pass 3 Pass
3 Pass 4 End

 

 As South, what would you lead with each of the following hands after East-West finish in 4?

 

 

1)

Q 7 6 5 4 K 7 6 5 J 5 J 5



2)

J 10 9 2 A 5 7 6 5 4 A 6 5

 


3)

K J 10 5 4 2 7 6 2 A 6 5


4)

A K 7 6 Q 6 5 10 9 8 6 5 4

 


5)

A 7 6 5 6 5 7 6 5 K J 6 5


6)

A 2 6 3 A 9 4 3 J 10 9 8 2

 

1)
5. With declarer likely to hold no more than five trumps it is sound practice to lead from your longest suit in an attempt to force his hand and develop a "long" trump trick for your side.

2)
4. North is likely to hold three trumps and no more than one diamond. With a certain trump entry and likely club entry, you plan to give North two diamond ruffs. Lead the four (lowest) to suggest an entry in the lower-ranking black suit, a suit preference signal in case North can ruff the first diamond. If the layout is as you envision it, you will beat 4 at least one trick. If you're feeling good, you ought to double 4.

3)
J. Again you are leading from length in an attempt to force declarer. This time it is your partner who holds the trump length. It's the flip side of 1).

4)
A. If you are not in the habit of leading unsupported aces, North will place you with short spades and might well give you a suit preference signal on this lead. With a likely entry in the trump suit, you may have a second chance to reach North's hand if you don't do so at trick two.

5)
5. With two unbid suits and no other obvious lead, it is common practice to lead from the suit without the ace. Perhaps the A can capture declarer's king later in the play.

6)
A. When a lead looks as obvious as the J, it's wise to double check. You can virtually "see" North's singleton or void in diamonds. Lead ace and another diamond (the "suit preference" nine) for North to ruff. He'll get you in with a spade for a second diamond ruff. Double. See problem 2)